Incredible photos from inside a Peruvian vinyl factory in the ’70s

Incredible photos from inside a Peruvian vinyl factory in the ’70s

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Legendary Peruvian label, recording studio and pressing plant Infopesa open their archives.

Founded by Alberto Maraví­ in 1971 against a backdrop of political instability and explosive creativity, Infopesa (Industria Fonográfica Peruana) was the powerhouse at the centre of the golden age of Peruvian music. Responsible for bringing salsa to the Latin American country, Maraví­’s Infopesa empire served both a radical local music scene and connected the country to major recording artists from around the world.

Just as comfortable photographed with Latin greats from the Fania stable as with huge US artists like Nat King Cole, Maraví oversaw the expansion of Infopesa into an internationally-renowned label, with its own recording studios, mastering suites and pressing plant. In 1989, Infopesa even survived a terrorist bombing which badly damaged several presses and the recording studio.

Approaching its forty fifth year, Infopesa is undergoing something of a renaissance as the only classic recording company still in operation in Peru. With Maraví’s son Juan Ricardo joining him at the helm and the Peruvian music industry in good health, the label has begun repressing classic psych, funk and cumbia records from its back catalogue. As Juan Ricardo told us:

“Our first release will be the edition of Cumbias Chichadelicas: Peruvian Psychedelic Chicha in vinyl format and due in November. This release is a compilation of classic songs from the psychedelic cumbia “Chicha” genre”.

They’ve even got closet cumbia nut Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand to write the liner notes. Juan continues: “Thanks to the demand that exist for our vinyl releases we have started selling limited editions of original vinyls from our catalog that were pressed in the ’70s and ’80s and that are completely new and sealed and have been in our storage all this time.”

The photos they’ve rescued from their archives below capture the Peruvian music industry at its height, lapels and all. Dating back to the 1970s as Infopesa began operations, they offer a glimpse of the factory floor, recording studio and mastering suite.

Check out more on the Infopesa Facebook page.

Alberto Maraví en sala de control de INFOPESA copy

Alberto Maraví at the controls


Control Room 2 INFOPESA copy

Inside the Infopesa control room


Empaque de Vinilos Infopesa copy

Packing 45s


Masterización y Corte - INFOPESA copy

Inside the mastering and cutting room


Producción de pasta para vinilos INFOPESA copy

Vinyl production


Producción de Vinilos INFOPESA copy

Pressing and packing records


Producción de Vinilos INFOPESA2 copy

Pressing 45s


Sala de Grabación INFOPESA - 1970 copy

The recording studio


Sala de Grabación Infopesa - 1970_2 copy

The recording studio


Sala de masterización INFOPESA copy

Inside the mastering studio


Photos courtesy of Infopesa.

  • Paul Saavedra Tafur

    Bellísimo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • I’ll be watching for “Cumbias Chichadelicas: Peruvian Psychedelic Chicha.”

  • cristbalbraunmesples

    http://www.pasosdecumbia.tv CAPITULO 7 ! CUMBIA CHICHA!

  • kludge

    Nice recorders… looks like a huge and lovely studio… but the mastering room
    looks a little crude and very widely laid-out… how can you run the lathe
    and the console at the same time? Did they have two people cutting?

    But… those manual record presses look awful. I have never seen anything
    like them before!

  • And then, chileans came and stole everything. Because, for all purposes, chileans are the reason why everything is wrong in Peru, according to peruvians.

  • Alberto

    Was that mixer a Langevin console?